The world is changing overnight and there is no escape

This title sounds like some science fiction movie and I can’t deny it feels very much like it. COVID-19. The zombies are coming! We’ve been in quarantine in Spain since Friday the 13th. The streets are dead. Shops are closed, apart from the supermarket. The hospital emergency waiting rooms are empty. People are all inside their homes. Waiting. Here you currently risk a fine of up to 3000 euro if the police catch you out on the streets without a valid reason (you can go grocery shopping, take a trip to the pharmacy or go to work if you really have to – and only travel solo). They have lost track of the correct number of infected people and nobody gets tested anymore, but here in Spain the official number jumps up with 1000 cases per day, 11,000 and around 500 deaths at the time of writing, most of them in Madrid. Just a week ago I was still being very flippant about the whole thing, as we only had about 400 cases and hey, what are the chances, right? And here we are.

covid 19 mental health impact
“This too shall pass”. Fallas statue in Valencia, with added face mask. Image: www.instagram.com/valencia_secreta/

The good thing is that most people will only have mild symptoms and won’t need to be hospitalised. It’s not the bubonic plague, you know (see this graph to compare different viruses throughout history). The whole quarantine thing however is not for you to not catch it, but to prevent the corona virus from spreading to those who will end up in hospital. People who are old, frail, sick already or have a lessened immune system for whatever reason – even though there are also cases of young, healthy people becoming critically ill. There just are not enough beds for all of them in intensive care, nor ventilation machines if the previously mild symptoms turn into serious pneumonia. So we all stay indoors for the sake of the country and beyond. We need to stop the virus so we can get back to normal. I know my UK readers will be in a different situation (at this time of writing), with their government not opting for the same approach.

What is normal?

But…what is ‘normal’ and do we actually want to go back to it after this is all over? Interesting question. It is a worrying time but I can’t help feeling a little excited too – weird I know and quite inappropriate. Excited because maybe this will be the thing that will change the world for the better, in the long run. Could it? It is definitely a time for reflection and a big obligatory pause for people no matter what race, gender, salary and political views. The virus hits us all – especially in the western world. We’re all sitting at home, forced to look at ourselves in the mirror. See our life for what it is, our partners, our children, our jobs, our crazy busy lifestyle. Who are we and why did we think we were leading a ‘normal’ life in the first place? Stocks are plummeting. Airlines are going bust. You would almost think planet earth is hitting back. You still think you can treat me like shit, after all environmental disasters, hurricanes, floods and famines? Here, catch this you fuckers.

covid 19 mental health impact

Ask me again in two weeks time, but right now it makes me happy to see all the good things that come out of people because of this unusual situation of being stuck indoors. The solidarity, the creativity, the resourcefulness you see on social media is incredible. I still believe in the good in people and apart from the initial greedy panic buying of truck loads of toilet paper, liters of hand sanitizer and 25 packs of spaghetti, I am optimistic. We are so used to the rat race, the consumerism, the individualism and the loss of connection to others, that this sudden lockdown is a breath of fresh air. Excuse the pun.

This too shall pass

People are reaching out to each other and strangers are becoming comrades. My heart filled with love and my eyes with tears last night at 8pm when I suddenly heard applauding, shouting and whistling outside from all the houses and balconies, by people around the city thanking hospital staff, police and other vital workers doing their best to stop the virus and care for the sick. This Thursday at 12 noon we’ll be treated, like they did in Italy last week, to live music from the communal orchestras, again from balconies. I saw a video of neighbours playing bingo from their open windows in an apartment block down in Andalucia. Valencia’s biggest annual festival Las Fallas was cancelled this week. A major decision that nobody expected, even a few weeks ago. The artists who had already created a Fallas statue of a meditating lady, with the title ‘This too shall pass’ (how apt), was given a face mask after the news. We all mourn about the loss of normality, but accept and adjust. We simply have no choice. We have to flatten the curve.

covid 19 mental health impact

Reinventing our existence

It is an alien situation and we are all trying to navigate through this sudden unwanted gift of time. We should make good use of it. History tells us that in 1665 Cambridge University was temporarily closed because of the plague and it was then that Isaac Newton thought of his law of gravity. Boredom and idleness lead to great inventions. The school Whatsapp groups however are in overdrive with mums and dads fearing this sudden standstill and the fact that they have the children at home, which obviously is not ideal when you still have work to do. They are sharing links to educational resources, online museum collections and libraries, just to offer some sort of quality entertainment while stuck in the house. The iPads are a godsend to entertain the kids, I am not denying that, but this compulsory indoor-holiday requires more effort than just the easy babysitter called screen-time.

covid 19 mental health impact
The kids’ dance teacher uploaded his class onto youtube

So far we have baked a cake, built Lego towers, are learning to play instruments (we are working on getting a family band up and running), are reading books, watch films, look up science experiments on Youtube and just spend a lot of time together as a family. How well do you know your child really and have oceans of time to cuddle and sit with them, look at their beautiful faces and listen with attention to what they are interested in? I bet I am not the only one to admit that modern life, work stress, long school hours and occupied minds are detrimental to real human connection. No doubt many children will remember this 2020 quarantine period as something quite special.



Content sharing

People are becoming very opportunistic and creative when stuck indoors. The dance teacher is uploading his classes onto Youtube so we can start the morning with a fun workout. Yoga and pilates classes and meditation sessions are all made accessible online. Music venues and concert halls upload concerts to enjoy for free. Artists offer tutorials online. It is incredible how many people are sharing quality content with each other worldwide. Not just for fun, but also because income has disappeared overnight and we’re all trying to figure out what to do next. We still have bills to pay. How do you earn money when you cannot meet face to face?

covid 19 mental health impact
Last year’s yoga retreat jumper suddenly became very appropriate during quarantine.

The sacrifices and losses in the corona battlefield

Small businesses are suffering greatly. No doubt many will go under during two or three weeks quarantine plus months of recovery and little trade. I am a self-employed content writer who lost a big client overnight because of COVID-19. An estate agent on the Costa Blanca I write and translate for suddenly has no one from northern Europe making plans to view and buy holiday homes anymore. My other job as bicycle tour guide has also suddenly been put on hold, because first of all of less tourism and currently because nobody is allowed outside. With no invoices to send there is no income. A self employed worker in Spain pays 283 euro a month to the social security system (compulsory, no matter what your earn), so go figure. A petition has been going around to ask the state for a payment break due to corona, but I am not very hopeful. Unfortunately we all know who gets hit the hardest in times like these.

Cheap flights and plastic from China

Earlier this week I shared a very interesting article published in Dezeen on my Facebook page about how Coronavirus offers “a blank page for a new beginning”. In it trend watcher Lidewij Edelkoort says “it seems we are massively entering a quarantine of consumption where we will learn how to be happy just with a simple dress, rediscovering old favourites we own, reading a forgotten book and cooking up a storm to make life beautiful.” She is hoping for a better system, a better balance for the environment and humans worldwide. I hope so too.

covid 19 mental health impact

Can we indeed go back to a simpler life? Buying less plastic crap from China? Being more conscious about the amount we consume? And then not just the people who already do this anyway…but could it become mainstream again? Growing our own food, and repairing stuff instead of our throwing away culture. A more honest, calmer way of life. Can we stop wanting to go on four holidays a year, on cheap flights to everywhere, burning the planet and ruining unspoiled territory around the world? Can we please stop? Get away from this ‘economic growth’ obsession? Wishful thinking perhaps, because money makes the world go round and no doubt the big guys at the top are already planning a recovery strategy to get back to ‘normal’. Still, as consumers, we have the power to right now start with a clean slate and make some significant changes to our lifestyle as a result of living through these strange weeks of lockdown, quarantine and self isolation. The virus has thrown us a brilliant opportunity to rethink and redesign our common future, for the next generations. Let’s not waste it.

covid 19 mental health impact

One thought on “The world is changing overnight and there is no escape

  1. Hi Nina, strange days indeed! Luckily I had decided before Christmas to pay myself from the crafting business, and buy a polytunnel for growing food here in Aberdeenshire. We are just building it now. Love and light, Sue Jones x

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