The best Christmas gifts for a calm and stress-free new year

OK, 2020 can go in the bin. Out with it. Let’s start again. Most people will agree that this year was just weird, and gave most of us an unusual amount of stress and anxiety. We don’t know yet if the first half of 2021 is going to be any different, but we can prepare ourselves better, for sure.

Here are my Christmas gift suggestions for a calmer, smoother and happier New Year. For your loved ones, or as gifts just for you. Because, WELL DONE for getting through it all! You are an amazing human being.


For a calmer mind

Beautiful notebooks

I love notebooks. I have about four on the go right now. Do I love a notebook as a gift? You bet! But what do you do with all of these scribbles when done with them? This Etsy Seller has the perfect idea: plant them! This notebook is size A6, £6 and 100% compostable. The cover has been embedded with five varieties of native British wildflowers, all classified as ‘plants for pollinators’ by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS). Journaling never felt so good. Shop for more handmade notebooks on Etsy.

Scented candles and essential oils

Smell can have such a calming effect on the mind. I love burning a scented candle or some incense. Candles are always a great gift at Christmas, or at anytime. Instead of buying mass-produced candles from the supermarket of high street store, which are often full of chemicals, support a crafter and order some natural, handmade ones. Shop for natural, handmade candles on Etsy.

A quality online yoga course

Once you got those candles burning, why not add a high quality online yoga course to the gift? Sure, you can find all kinds of free yoga on Youtube these days, but why not take the stress out of searching and buy a full course that you know is good? I can recommend Yoga by Jennison, a California girl living in Valencia, who offers a fabulous, healing yoga experience online and offline (she kept many of us sane and fit throughout lockdown!). Check out her online yoga courses.

Organic CBD oil

CBD oil has become a popular natural go-to remedy for providing relief for anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. It is also used to promote sleep. No more stress and insomnia in 2021 please! Part of CBD’s popularity is that consumers can reap health benefits from the cannabis plant without the high you would experience from smoking the stuff. So it’s totally safe, even for granny. Nordic Oil is a Spanish company that ships across Europe within 7 days.

eco-friendly christmas gifts

For a calm home office

Working from home is not going anywhere next year (excuse the pun), so items for the home office make popular Christmas gifts for him and her. Here’s a few ideas.

The perfect weekly planner for a clear head

I bought this sturdy A4 size weekly planner for myself recently and it is great. You don’t have to print it out like many others on Etsy, it comes ready in the post and is backed with cardboard. You can create a clear layout of your tasks for the week, while it also leaves space for private appointments and other commitments. The weekly planner costs £9.00, a great Christmas gift for 2020 and you’ll sure make someone (or yourself) very happy. For more options (or US based, if you need something closer to home), check out these planners on Etsy too.

christmas gifts 2020 etsy

A wooden laptop stand

With everyone working from home this year, sore shoulders, arms and wrists are on the rise. Working long hours on a laptop is not ideal health wise and investing in a laptop stand to raise the screen is important. With a separate screen and mouse your work station becomes a lot more ergonomic. Find this one and other gorgeous handmade natural wooden laptop stands on Etsy. They sure make a good and thoughtful Christmas gift.

eco friendly christmas gift

Gifts to keep healthy

If we’ve learned anything this year, is that we need to look after our immune system the best we can. That means eating healthily, exercising more and generally doing more wholesome stuff than scrolling down your Facebook feed and getting all worked up about the state of the world. If we keep fit and healthy, we have little to fear from any virus.

Organic gardening starter kit

Even if you only have a balcony, you can start a little garden. Use pots, baskets, trays and start growing your own herbs, vegetables, salad leafs and more. It’s nurturing for the soul and nourishing for your body. This organic gardening kit by small UK based business Wyld Bank contains: 78 open-pollinated seeds, a ‘How to Guide’ on growing and seed saving, hemp twine, six pretty muslin seed bags, notebook and pencil, six plant labels and a mini illustration of the picture on the cottage garden box. Oh, and apparently also a little surprise on opening. At £15.00 this sounds like a great Christmas gift to me.

eco friendly christmas gift

Gifts for better sleep

Sleep is super important for healing, moods, concentration and keeping a strong immune system. Let’s invest in great sleep this coming year, starting with the best pillow. And pillows are no longer just reserved for your head; neck pillows, knee supports, front sleeping pillows and body pillows, there are many pillows to help you find the most comfortable position to rest in. Check out Kally Sleep, for the best solutions for getting quality sleep.

Smoothie bowls

And when you get up…time for a wholesome, healthy breakfast in some beautiful bowls made of coconut shells. Each of these coconut bowls are crafted from a real coconut shell. They are 100% natural, safe, ecological, and environmentally friendly. Find more coconut bowl sets on Etsy.

eco-friendly christmas gifts

Eco-friendly Yoga wear

Support a small UK business and buy your beloved yogi a natural rubber yoga mat, free from PVC. Make it into a beautiful gift set and add some matching eco-friendly yoga wear, in material made from recycled plastic bottles. Super luxurious soft fabric, blended with spandex. High-waisted fit for maximum comfort. Check out the yoga wear collection from Planet Warrior.

Disclaimer: This article contains affiliate links that I receive a small commission for at no cost to you. I only ever recommend products that I love and would use myself also. You can read my full affiliate disclosure in my privacy policy.

Colourful Boho Chic Christmas Décor Ideas

Minimalist was never your thing anyway? Go for a Boho Chic Christmas this year! Choose bold colours, crazy patterns, folklore, floral and gypsy touches and your home will certainly look unique this festive season. Today I am sharing some inspiring boho chic and folklore Christmas decorations that are to awake your inner hippie, even if you haven’t tried such ideas before.

Boho chic christmas decor
Go bold and colourful with your Christmas decorations, using garlands, wreaths and fairy lights.

Boho Chic Christmas Tree Décor

Let’s start with a wonderfully colourful Christmas tree. It can be decorated with vintage and folklore styled ornaments, colourful pompoms and garlands and bold lights. No space for a tree? Try hanging a stick Christmas tree on the wall and decorate it with colourful ornaments. Use a crocheted, patchwork or woven round rug as a tree skirt. The more colours and bohemian patterns you add into the mix, the more fun you’ll have. No minimalist less is more here. Go bold!

boho chic christmas tree
Decorate your tree with silk flowers for a truly gorgeous Boho Chic Christmas! See the tutorial here.
Boho chic christmas decor
Vintage Christmas baubles are the ideal way to create a bold colourful Boho Chis Christmas tree. Buy a box full on Etsy or source them in your local vintage shops.
Boho chic christmas decor
No space for a real tree? Temporary replace that artwork with a wall hung tree made out of branches!
boho chic christmas decor
Use a crocheted round rug as a tree skirt to finish off your boho chic Christmas decor. This one can be found on Etsy.


Christmas Ornaments, boho style

Choose colourful folklore and boho chic ornaments and make some unique ones yourself. You can crochet them, make mini dream catchers with feathers, use crystal pendants or make an ornament garland or wreath. Find some vintage ornaments and make a hanging using an embroidery hoop and bold ribbon. You don’t even need a tree to display ornaments: just hang them on a string or on the window, along your stair banister or pin them on the wall. You can also put them on the mantel or put ornaments into a jar to add to your festive boho chic atmosphere.

Boho chic christmas decor
Lovely wooden dream catcher ornaments on Etsy

Boho Chic Christmas Wreaths

No Christmas is complete without a wreath on your door! Make this year’s wreath keeping the bold boho style in mind: make an evergreen wreath with plenty of colourful decorations, a floral piece wreath interwoven with lights or a wreath in dream catcher style. Macramé and crochet are welcome, colourful pompoms will make also make fabulous and unique Christmas wreaths. You can also make a wreath of sticks and some greenery for a natural feel.

Boho chic christmas decor
Pom poms make an instant colourful impact when made into a wreath. This one is on Etsy

Boho Chic Christmas Stockings

If you use stockings as part of your Christmas décor, you can really push out the boat whenit comes to the boho chic and folklore theme. Adhorn your stocking with vintage fabrics, small crocheted squares or patchwork, beads, buttons, ribbons and bits of lace for a bold and colourful effect. They will spruce up any mantel.

boho chic christmas stockings
Use up your favourite fabric remnants, ribbons and tassels to make beautiful Boho Chic Christmas stockings

The cutest eco-friendly Christmas gifts for children

Need some ideas for no plastic gift ideas for children? I’m with you. Birthday parties, Christmas presents, gifts brought by visiting relatives, children get a lot of stuff. And if you have young children like me, this stuff amounts to a lot over the months and years. Boxes full of toy cars, action figures and dolls and a lot of plastic you’d rather not have in your house. It’s messy and half of it the kids don’t even play with. I bet most parents would agree. Still, a child’s birthday or Christmas requires a gift as you don’t want to see sad faces. How about not adding to the heap of expensive commercial plastic toys, but bringing something imaginative instead? Here are some suggestions I love.


A Craft & bead box for creative little hands

Got a cute vintage tin or a wooden box with a lid? Or how about pimping up an old shoe box? A lot of children around the age of 5-8 or older love to make things like bracelets or necklaces, so create a beautiful treasure box for them! Fill a box with old beads, ribbons, buttons, scrap fabric and string and let their imagination do the rest. I know I would have loved to receive a box full of things like that. Not got anything lying around? For £16.95 you can buy a colourful, read-made wooden bead box from Etsy.

eco-friendly christmas gifts


Non-plastic gifts for kids: wooden Kapla construction sets

My kids love Kapla. It’s been around for decades, and it is such a simple concept; a box of small equally shaped wooden slats of the same size. You can stack them to build towers, use them to create large shaped on the floor, make houses, animals, bridges, anything. It’s wonderful stuff. Smallable sells a 100pc box for 30. One of the best, guilt free, eco-friendly Christmas gifts for kids. Go for it.

Check out their other beautiful wooden toys here.

eco-friendly christmas gifts

Eco-friendly Christmas gifts for kids: Colouring posters

Colouring books, always a winner. This super cool street art colouring poster would go down very well with my boys, that’s for sure. At 10€ a perfect stocking filler too.

eco-friendly christmas gifts

Wooden Board games and other family fun

I must admit, I’ve never really been one for games, but being a parent I kind of had to get into it. Snakes and ladders, Ludo, Memory, Uno, you name it, my kids love it. I don’t know whether it’s the game itself or the fact that you are playing it with them and they can beat you, but I sure score some brownie points when I get on the floor or around the table for a board game. We were given a great wooden Snakes and Ladders/Ludo combo board a few years back and it gets used every week. Definitely not something that will end up in the forgotten toys corner any time soon. Charity and second-hand shops usually have games in stock, so worth checking. If you rather invest in something high quality and new as a gift for the family to enjoy together for years to come, then Etsy is a good bet for eco-friendly Christmas gifts.

eco-friendly christmas gifts for kids

Toys for motor and balancing skills for younger kids

How cute are these cats? Your toddler will love trying to stack them on top of the mummy cat and see how they tumble down. Bored of stacking? They’ll easily turn the figures into a play set. Find these and other stacking sets over on Smallable. This set costs €19.

eco-friendly christmas gifts for kids

Gorgeous Montessori rainbow stacking set

This may just look like a set for early learners, but I was surprised to see my six-year-old playing with a similar set over a friend’s house the other day. Instead of only stacking them, he turned the blocks into tunnels for cars, flipped them sideways to make them into little toy car parking spaces and upside down to find they make excellent ramps and sea-saws for play figures. No instruction book need, just let their imagination flow! This set is €25 over on Smallable.

eco-friendly christmas gifts for kids
eco-friendly christmas gifts



Curious festive traditions from around the world. The season of death, darkness and peculiar saints

Moving abroad means meeting people from all over the world, all with different backgrounds and customs. You chat to them about life, family traditions and “what are you doing for Christmas?” and soon discover that people have all been brought up with different things. It is very educational to say the least, and wonderful to learn about what everyone celebrates from October to December. Here are some of the known and lesser known traditions you can find around the world this season. Some rather scary ones too.

Halloween. No, it is not an American invention

An American lady here in my hometown of Valencia posted in a Facebook expat group how she was keen to “organise the typical American experience of trick or treating” in Valencia and invited us all to take part. I don’t think she saw what was coming next, namely a whole host of Scots and Irish expats telling her that she “didn’t have to show them, thank you very much, as halloween is a holiday of Gaelic origin – not American.” I guess that was her told – ouch.

Halloween, or the ancient Samhain, is considered the time of year when the veil between our world and the spirit world is at its thinnest. Samhain (pronounced sah-van or sow-in) is the traditional Gaelic festival marking the change of seasons and the approach of winter. Dead and departed relatives played a central role in the tradition, as the connection between the living and dead was believed stronger at Samhain, and there was a chance to communicate. The idea that souls return home on a certain day of the year is repeated across many cultures around the world, including the Day of the Dead in Mexico around the same date. During Samhain or Halloween eventually, mumming and guising (going door-to-door in disguise and performing in exchange for food), or pranks, were a way of confounding evil spirits. Pranks at Samhain date as far back as 1736 in Scotland and Ireland, and this led to Samhain being dubbed “Mischief Night”. The original lanterns in Ireland and Scotland were carved from turnips, not pumpkins.

As a Dutchie who didn’t grow up with Halloween, I went around my local Spanish neighbourhood with an Irish friend this year, as well as a group of Spanish parents and a Swedish mum, who also felt a bit out of place. It was a laugh, and kind of odd trick or treating in a T-shirt in still 24 degrees at night. For the Spanish this halloween thing really is a novelty. Hilarious and entertaining to see everyone learning from each other and adapting to new customs.

All Saints Day in Spain

The day after Halloween the Spanish celebrate All Saints’ day, or Día de todos los Santos, where they remember their dearly departed and bring flowers to the graves of their deceased loved ones. Of course nothing goes without eating in Spain and there are a few traditional sweets that the Spanish eat on All Saints’ Day. The most common are the so-called huesos de santo (literally, “saint’s bones”), which are made of marzipan and sweetened egg yolk. Another treat you’ll find are buñuelos de viento, puffy fried balls of dough filled with pastry cream, whipped cream, or chocolate. Yum!

Yum, how about a bite in the old Saint’s bones?

Day of the Dead, more than just a costume

Day of the Dead, taking place in Mexico the first few days of November, is currently a bit of a fashionable theme for people choosing their halloween costumes, but is actually an ancient celebration that is way more than a bit of makeup and a lot of flower displays. Some of the earliest origins of the tradition can be traced as far back to 2,000-3000 year-old rituals honouring the dead in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. Celebrating the lives of deceased family members and friends, people believe that during this part of the year, loved ones can return from the Chicunamictlán – the land of the dead – because the border between the real and spiritual world melts away.

When Spanish colonisers came to the region, they carried the Catholic holidays of All Saints Day and All Souls Day, celebrated on the first two days of November. Day of the Dead was moved to correspond closer to these days. In 2008, UNESCO added the country’s “indigenous festivity dedicated to the dead” to its list of so-called Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

Day of the Dead in Mexico, with their colourful parades and iconic face masks

St Martin and the paper lanterns

In the Netherlands, at least the north where I grew up, as well as parts of Germany, we celebrate Saint Martins Day on the 11th of November. The day is named after St. Martin of Tours, a Roman soldier who became a monk after being baptised as an adult. He was eventually made a saint by the Catholic Church for being a kind man who cut his cloak in half to share with a beggar during a snowstorm – although as a child I never knew this part of the story. All I remember is that we went around the streets after dark with paper lanterns knocking on people’s doors, sang songs about St Martin and received sweets and oranges in return. It often rains that time of year, so you can imagine the sight: soggy lanterns and frozen children.

Saint Martin, going around the houses and singing songs in return for sweets

Saint Nicholas or ‘Sinterklaas’ in the Netherlands

Staying in the Netherlands, we are also the first to kick off the festive season with our Saint Nicholas on the evening of 5th of December, or 6th of December in Germany, Belgium, Luxembourg and Northern France. This saint is a legendary figure based on the historical figure of Saint Nicholas (270–343), a Greek bishop of Myra in present-day Turkey and the patron saint of children. Saint Nicolas, who is believed to also be the predecessor of good old Santa Claus, introduced to the United States of America by Dutch immigrants, who, just like myself, couldn’t shake off some of their old customs. Some people refuse to believe this, but Santa Claus actually received his jolly, cuddly image from Coca Cola, who felt the old bishop needed a non-religious makeover.

The Dutch with their peculiar tradition of St Nicholas and his black helpers…coming on a boat from Spain and bringing presents to the children in the Netherlands.

In the Netherlands however, we have kept the St Nicholas tradition alive and well. It is also the cause of wide eyes and disbelief among the international community when I try and explain what in my mind has always been a very innocent tradition. St Nicholas is depicted as an elderly, stately and serious man with white hair and a long, full beard. He wears a long red cape over a traditional white bishop’s alb, dons a red mitre and ruby ring, and holds a gold-coloured crosier, a long ceremonial shepherd’s staff with a fancy curled top. For some reason the old man with the beard no longer comes from Turkey, but he now arrives every year on a boat from Spain. Until recently our St Nicholas, or Sinterklaas, was assisted by a large number of Zwarte Pieten (“Black Petes”), curious helpers dressed in Moorish attire and in blackface, who would take naughty kids back to Spain in a sack. Wowzers. As a child I know for certain we thought nothing of it: they were just the Saint’s helpers, not a racist imitation of people with a black or brown skin colour. Their black colour was because they climbed through the chimney, obviously. And somehow they ended up wearing gold earrings and curly black wigs with it. Cue: gasping audience. You will be glad to hear that Zwarte Piet has left the scene and was in recent years replaced by Rainbow Pete

Did Black Pete made you cringe? Meet Krampus, his evil Austrian brother

A beast-like demon creature that roams city streets frightening kids and punishing the bad ones – nope, this isn’t Halloween, but St. Nicholas’ evil accomplice, Krampus. Just like in the Netherlands, in Austrian tradition, St. Nicholas rewards good little boys and girls, while Krampus is said to capture the naughtiest children and whisk them away in his sack. In the first week of December, young men dress up as the Krampus (especially on the eve of St. Nicholas Day) frightening the living daylight out of kids with clattering chains and bells. Holy shoot. Give me back rainbow Pete any time.

Hide your broom in Norway

Perhaps one of the most unique Christmas Eve traditions can be found in Norway, where people hide their brooms. Yes, that’s right. Nevermind the manic last minute gift wrapping or preparing the Turkey for Christmas dinner. Get that broom safely in the cupboard. It’s a tradition that dates back centuries to when people believed that witches and evil spirits came out on Christmas Eve looking for brooms to ride on. To this day, many people still hide their brooms in the safest place in the house to stop them from being stolen.

Make your own home scent with this Christmas potpourri recipe

Stove top potpourri, ever heard of it? Forget the chemical scented candles and expensive room scent diffusers, just put a load of fresh fruit and spices in a large pan and let it simmer on the stove. Just a wonderful scent filling your home, with only natural ingredients. The perfect welcome for your guests on Christmas day, before they sit down for their Christmas dinner. Or just to get you in the Christmas spirit the days before.

How do you make it? Here’s the Christmas potpourri recipe for this lovely DIY home scent. Merry Christmas!


Christmas potpourri recipe for stove top

Just check now and then if it still has enough water so it doesn’t boil dry and let the heat do the work. Enjoy your own homemade Christmas potpourri!

The most beautiful natural Christmas table settings

Whatever you will be serving on Christmas day, beautiful natural Christmas table settings will make your table look even better. It doesn’t have to be complicated and you don’t need a degree in design, less is more. You can keep it simple and make a big impact by using natural materials like branches, twigs and leaves. Be resourceful and have a look around the house for what you already own. Use your beautiful vintage glassware, silver cutlery, linen fabrics, burlap and plain white candles in clear bottles. Here are some ideas.

rustic christmas table settings
christmas Image: Boxwood Avenue

Rustic Christmas table setting

Go all natural and rustic by using a linen table running in the middle, topped with natural fresh tree branches. Use some vintage or other solid brass candle holders as well as candles or tea lights in glasses. Simple white dinner ware and linen napkins add to this look, which is both very understated and very stylish.

Rustic natural centerpieces

Gather some greenery, branches and pine cones from the forest to create beautiful centerpieces for your natural Christmas table settings. To make the vases or pots, use large tins and wrap them with burlap or other fabric.

rustic table centerpiece
Image: A Piece of Rainbow

Table centre pieces with glass bottles

Festive decorating can easily become over the top with ribbons, dancing santas, flashing fairy lights and bottle brush trees on every surface. Using natural materials in your holiday decorating will bring back a bit of peace and tranquility in this busy time of year. Try going ‘Scandinavian‘ in your decorations and reuse your white wine bottles as candle stick holders, and fill them with water, leaves and sprigs.

natural christmas table decoration

Don’t forget the napkins: attention is in the detail

Don’t bother with trying to fold twelve napkins into the shape of a snowflake. Who has time for that? Just roll your simple linen napkins up and tie them with a pretty bit of string, ribbon or even leather. A tiny sprig finishes the look.

December blues, the sadness of being far away from loved ones

Do you feel it too? End of year sadness and December blues? I don’t know if it is the darkness, the cold, the fact that another year has passed way too quickly or that you realise that you haven’t seen friends or family for a very long time. End of year melancholy. Homesickness for a home that it no longer yours. It’s not easy when you have moved away.

A comfortable coat that no longer fits

I’ve been an emigrant since I was 26. That is almost 14 years now. Fourteen years away from my motherland, the soil I grew up on. I almost feel like a tourist now when I visit. A strange combination of familiarity and foreign-ness. When I arrive back in the area I was born in, it feels like an old, comfortable coat, but after a while I also realise it doesn’t fit me anymore.

And now I uprooted for the second time ten months ago, finding my feet on foreign soil yet again. It’s been very exciting both times I moved country, for very different reasons. The first time around I moved to Scotland to be with my love and subsequently stayed more than twelve years to build up a life together, get married and start a family.

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December blues and juggling family

This year we moved to Spain, because we both desired a new adventure, more sunshine and a different lifestyle for our family. And because well, a change does one good and all that. Good decision so far? Yes, although it’s not a permanent holiday like some people cheekily put it. School settling in dramas, language barriers and navigating the bureaucracy are just a few of our struggles this year. But hearing my little boys babble in Spanish to their teacher and the babysitter fills me with pride.

And now it is almost Christmas. Everyone who has family living far away will know this dilemma: where will we be spending Christmas this year? With my husband’s parents living in Wales and mine in the Netherlands, this has always been tricky. And then when your own parents decide to separate, things get even more complicated. Families, eh?

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Looking back and standing still: another year has past

In Spain it doesn’t get any easier. Flights are a bit longer and not necessarily cheaper, despite more of the low cost airlines flying in our direction. So it’s a puzzle. This year we are actually skipping the family Christmases all together and are flying back to Scotland. Catching up with as many friends as we can possibly cram into two weeks. But it feels funny and these decisions are never without guilt. But then that is also the case when you decide to celebrate Christmas with one family and not the other. How do you juggle this issue?

So yes, December blues, although not in a depressive kind of way. Just reflecting. Taking a moment to stand still and be thankful.

This month most of us will reflect on the past year and all the things that have happened. The good times, the crappy times, the parties, the holidays, the busy work weeks, the day-in-day-out kids routines, the weeks that flew by. All the people you met, the new friends you made, the people you said goodbye to. The pets you have lost or that came into your life. The houses you moved out of. The things you felt really bad about, but didn’t matter in the end. The things you failed to do, but everyone has already forgotten about. Another year gone. Kids are growing up too fast, parents are getting older. What will next year bring?

More moments together. That’s what makes life meaningful.

This is a (Spanish) video that speaks more than a thousand words, even if you don’t quite understand what they’re saying. Friends and family speaking fondly of each other and how much they enjoy spending time together, and admit they don’t do this enough. At the end of the video the filmmaker tells them how much time in their life they actually have left together if they continue to see each other as often as they do now… Yep, a lot less than they thought. Days rather than years. Hours rather than days.

 

Artificial Christmas tree or real tree: the pros and cons

Real tree or artificial Christmas tree? What’s in your home? I am going to warn you, I am biast. I have always preferred real Christmas trees over fake ones. Just because I love authentic, nice things and a plastic tree just never fitted that picture. Still, I wanted to look at the options more closely, because more and more people have them nowadays for various reasons. Some claim it is in fact a more eco-friendly option than buying a real tree year after year, only to throw it outside after a few weeks. But a plastic tree…environmentally friendly? Not sure. By the way, did you know the fake tree was invented by a U.S.-based toilet bowl brush manufacturer, the Addis Brush Company? This company created an artificial tree from brush bristles in the 1930s, acting as the prototype for modern artificial trees. Interesting little bit of history, right?

So what’s the truth? What are the options and what are the pros and cons of real versus fake trees?

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Real Christmas tree: Pros

The smell

You can’t beat the smell of a real Christmas tree. The fresh smell when you brush against the branches. It fills your home with Christmas!

You support local business

By buying a real tree from a local tree grower, you support local business. These businesses spend all year caring for their trees so that you can take one home and enjoy it during the Christmas holidays. Some vendors make it into a whole experience: getting you to pick your favourite tree, wrapping it up, selling hot chocolate and coffees on site to warm up. It can be a lovely trip out for the family if it’s somewhere picturesque in the countryside, on a frosty December morning.

It is natural. And biodegradable.

If you hate plastic, you want a real tree. A real tree from nature. Falling needles and all. No point trying to convert you, as a fake plastic Christmas tree will not enter your house. Real trees are authentic. And they will not sit in landfill forever.

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Real Christmas tree: Cons

Needles

Some are worse than others, but all real Christmas trees will at some point lose their needles. Central heating is the main cause and then there are kids and pets brushing against it. You’ll be sweeping up and hoovering almost daily and if you’re really unlucky, your tree is not looking great anymore by the time it is Christmas day.

It gets thrown out every year

I don’t know about you, but I always feel sorry for the Christmas tree the first week of January. Decoration taken down and off it goes, dragged through the hallway and out the front door onto the pavement. All bare and needles brown and dropping. It’s done a good job, but poor tree.

They cost money…every year

Real Christmas trees are pricey. And on top of gifts, food, drink and maybe travel, it is an extra cost in December you could maybe do without.



Artificial Christmas tree: pros

They look perfect

Look at the image above. Perfect. No lop sided trees with one side thicker than the other. Or funny looking tall ones with a long thin top which makes the topper bend down. A fake tree is perfectly shaped in a perfect shade of green and with perfectly even spread of branches.

You can leave the decorations in

If you’re really short of time, energy or are just plain lazy, you can get a ready decorated fake tree. Job done. Fold it up, put it in a bag and store it away for next year. Boring and uninspiring? Perhaps. But convenient it sure is. And not everyone loves being creative and crafty.

You reuse it every year

No need to shop around for trees, just get it down from the loft and put it up. It saves money for sure. If you buy a high quality one, you’ll be using it for many years. My own parents-in-law apparently have had their artificial Christmas tree since the 1980s. That sure is a durable solution.

vintage advert for artificial christmas trees

Artificial Christmas tree: the cons

It still ends up in landfill

No matter how many years you use your tree for, it still is plastic and at some point in the future will end up in the bin. I wonder how many of those sold in the 1960s are still taking pride of place in the living room this December. I know, you say, but what about all the other plastic household things you use that will break at some point in the future…kettles, light shades, garden tools, buckets, bins, toys, etc… Yes, you are right. But perhaps next time you need to replace those, it’s worth looking for non plastic, more durable alternatives too. In case of a tree, it is easy to make that decision right now. But if you already own a plastic one, keep it forever!

There is no smell

Nothing beats the smell of…plastic? I suppose you could light a fragrant candle in the room to add some seasonal smells, but they sure won’t come from your artificial Christmas tree. If you like the smell of nature, a fake tree won’t do the job.

Toxic ingredients

Fake trees are questionable in terms of human health. Today’s artificial trees are typically manufactured with metal and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), a non-biodegradable, petroleum-derived plastic. In addition, many older varieties may contain lead, used as a stabilizer in the manufacturing process.


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Conclusion

The artificial Christmas tree is non-recyclable and non-biodegradable, meaning they will sit in a landfill for centuries after disposal. An artificial Christmas tree will last on average five to seven years, meaning you’ll eventually have to dispose of it, and many secondhand stores will not accept them. There’s also no guarantee the LED lights will last the whole time you own it, and they can’t be removed and replaced like with a real tree.

I believe it is a good idea to choose natural materials over plastic as much as possible, so you can guess what I am supporting.

Alternatives

Buy a tree in a pot

Don’t like the thought of sad dead trees on the doorstep after Christmas? You can of course opt to buy a fresh Christmas tree, in a pot. You can then plant it in your garden after Christmas is over and dig it up again next year. The question is always whether it survives after having lived in a heated living room for a good few weeks, but it is worth a try. Don’t forget to water it!

Adopt a tree!

How about giving it back to the grower? You enjoy it over Christmas and then it goes back ‘home’, where it gets looked after for another year. Not a very mainstream option yet, but it does exist. Find out more on Adopt a Christmas tree schemes or do a Google for your own local area.

Go Minimalist

Don’t want a tree at all? Decorate a large house plant. Or collect a few nice branches from the forest on your next walk and place them in a large vase for a minimalist look. Ideas plenty.

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Go radical

I will just leave this here. Merry Christmas!

Turn Black Friday into Green Friday! Six alternative ideas to try

ALTERNATIVE BLACK FRIDAY

Happy Green Friday everyone! Your Facebook timeline and Inbox will be bombarded with Black Friday ads today trying to lure you into spending money on stuff you don’t really need. Tempting, I know, because wow, such big discounts! (or…are they really?). Here is a little reminder for some feel-good and guilt-free alternatives. Please share this post to remind others too….because advertising is powerful and people will be spending way too much on Amazon today! Let’s support the small guys today or, hey, just have a coffee with a loved one instead.

  1. Buy Art


    Art, it makes you happy, it is unique, you can’t have enough of it AND you make a creative individual do a little happy dance when you buy from them. What else do you need to know? This is my personal number one when it comes to buying presents at Christmas – or for any occasion. Where to find art? Pop into a local gallery, find local artists at fairs and markets this season or browse artists on sites such as Artfinder, Etsy or Redbubble.

  2. Buy Local


    It is very convenient to buy everything at the click of a button from Amazon, and we’ve all done it, but don’t complain when another shop in the high street goes out of business! Go out there and support your local stores, craft fairs and Christmas markets. Every penny spent locally on Green Friday or any time of the year goes back into your local economy and keeps your neighbourhood, town or village alive.

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  3. Buy Vintage


    Vintage toys, vintage clothes, vintage jewellery, vintage homeware, beautiful vintage collectables. Totally guilt-free because it already existed anyway. And do you know how much love and time goes into sourcing these beauties, by passionate, knowledgeable and very dedicated vintage shop owners? I know, because I used to be one! And I know many of my vintage trading friends will 100% agree with me. And what is more unique as a gift than to give someone a gift with a story to tell? Go and support these hard working vintage treasure hunters.

  4. Swap something


    Got clothes you no longer need? Books you’ve read, too many kitchen items or gardening tools? Organise a Swap Shop! It’s a lot of fun getting a group of friends together and make each other happy with items you no longer need. I did it a few times with clothes and I tell you, they were one of the best little parties I had. A few clothes rails are handy to display the clothes, or just use a large table and some baskets for smaller items to rummage through. Expect plenty of laughter, silliness, drinks and nibbles and time for a good catch-up while others are trying to squeeze themselves into each other’s old evening dresses. You get the picture. Go and do it. It’s great.

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  5. Buy Eco-Friendly


    How about creating some lovely hampers with eco-friendly items on Green Friday? Great for those New Year’s resolutions to finally give up on plastic bags and chemicals in your bathroom and kitchen. Think of Beeswax food wraps, a bamboo takeaway coffee cup for on the road, lovely handmade natural soaps wrapped, etc. Also check out the Ethical Superstore for guilt-free gift ideas.

  6. Make do and Mend


    Got a pile of clothes lying in the corner that need buttons sewn on, gaps repaired and patches stitched on? Before you spend too much money in the Black Friday ‘sales’, go and put the kettle on, pick a Netflix film you were meaning to watch for ages and fix those holes.


Happy Green Friday everyone!

Eco-friendly packaging ideas for Christmas

Gift boxes look very pretty under the Christmas tree – or at any occasion. So do gift bags and pretty shiny wrapping paper. But after buying the gift itself you don’t really want to be spending more money on something that is going to end up in the recycling bin within minutes after opening. Some rolls of paper are hellishly expensive, let alone cute boxes with bows and sparkly bags. Time for some creative eco-friendly packaging ideas!

1. Toilet rolls turn into gift boxes

I admit, it may be a bit weird to some, but genius it is. Jewellery and other small gifts are best presented in a box. But why buy little gift boxes when you probably have at least five empty toilet rolls sitting on the window sill in the bathroom, or in the paper recycling bin.

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2. Brown paper: eco-friendly packaging for Christmas gifts

Recently on Facebook a post went viral about wrapping paper not being recyclable and how we should all use brown paper instead. Now although this is total nonsense, about the wrapping paper not being recyclable (unless it is covered in glitter or laminated), the idea of brown paper as an alternative eco-friendly packaging idea for gifts is lovely! The plain brown paper lends itself really well to creative additions, such as stamps, a lick of paint or just nice string and some greenery. A great way to add a stylish ‘Scandinavian touch’ to your Christmas party. Spend next Sunday making your own unique paper and impress your family with beautifully wrapped gifts. Plenty of inspiration on Pinterest.

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3. Recycled paper eco-friendly gift bags

Gift bags. Just like gift boxes, these are not cheap considering they are probably only going to be used once – or if you are frugal and keep them in the storage cupboard afterwards – a few times. Anyway, you will also have a pile of magazines lying around, or newspaper, which can easily be turned into cute, homemade and very Pinterest-worthy gift bags. Want to give it a shot? Check out this page on Pinterest for ideas and tutorials to create your own beautiful eco-friendly packaging.

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4. Recycle last year’s Christmas card into Gift tags

Still got last year’s Christmas cards in the decorations box? Cut them up! You can make very nice gift tags with them. Or if you don’t need tags, why not try some paper Christmas bunting?

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