When life gives you lemons…upcycle your skills.

Imagine being a happy freelancer, doing what you love, and then from one day to the next, all contracts stop and you have no idea when work will pick up again. Yep, it happened to many this year, as we all know. Ryan Godwin was one of them, a theatre set builder from London, now living in Valencia. Like everywhere in the cultural sector, all work suddenly disappeared when Covid arrived, and not just in the UK but across Europe. How does a theatre set builder reinvent himself in times of a crisis?

From flipping burgers to West End shows

“I always liked making things, being creative,” Ryan says, as we sit down in his big rough and ready workshop in the area of Cabanyal, near the beach. “I actually ended up as a set builder in the theatre world totally by accident. I was flipping burgers at an event, and got annoyed by stuff strewn on the floor of the van. So I just built some shelving to tidy it up. Turned out the owners of the burger place were West End actors. They were impressed by my carpentry and introduced me into the theatre world in London. That was the start of a 10-year career. I since worked as a set builder for many West End shows, major TV/film productions and events, including the London Fashion Week and the X Factor. It’s been a fascinating job.”

Upcycling business Valencia

“In 2019 I fancied a change though, and with set builders from the UK having a good reputation across Europe, I managed to secure some big jobs in Spain and Italy for 2020. So I was looking forward to continuing my trade, but now based in Valencia. Unfortunately the pandemic threw a spanner in the way.”

“I was faced with a sudden harsh reality of sitting at home, in Spain, with no work, a loss of identity and feeling quite depressed as a result, to be honest. I didn’t know what to do with myself. There was no work for any of us in the industry. I heard of colleagues back in London being contracted to build coffins instead. It was grim. It’s only been a few weeks or so that I am beginning to pick up the pieces.”

Upcycling business Valencia

Spice racks and bedside tables

This Autumn, Ryan decided to go back to his trusted carpentry skills and start making things for fun. Usable stuff for the home, made from scrap wood, which he finds in the street. First just some shelves, but people like his work, and he has already been commissioned to make a set of bedside tables. He is now making coffee tables, spice and wine racks, bookshelves and other unique pieces of furniture, from his Cabanyal workshop. In a corner of the large brick, industrial looking space, stand a number of cool looking pieces of furniture, made out of recycled wood. One of them a coffee table made from slats, on top of an old metal single bed frame.

Upcycling business Valencia

Upcycling old wood and telling its story

“It feels good repurposing old wood, it balances things out for me.”, he explains. “You wouldn’t believe how wasteful the set building industry is. I once worked as a set builder at Winter Wonderland in Hyde Park and remember being horrified by the sight of four articulated lorries stuffed full of wood that had been used for the food stalls. None of the material could be reused, and was taken straight to the dump, only because it was covered in some food or oil. There are companies who take stuff away for recycling, but half the time it just ends up in the incinerator.”

Ryan finds usable wood and other materials left next to bins and in skips in Valencia, on the streets, anywhere, and keeps it from going to landfill. He takes stuff apart, cleans it, cuts it to size, sands it down, finishes it, and turns it into beautiful designs. “It’s fun creating things. I am a big fan of history and love the fact that something has a past. I try and leave the patina, so you still see some of that history in the wood.” He is slowly expanding his collection, trying to find out what people need and like, and then making it. An online shop is in the making too.

Ryan decided to name his new venture Made in Valencia. But perhaps it should be called re-Made in Valencia. After all, it’s not just the wood that’s been given a second chance.

You can find Ryan’s upcycling business in Valencia currently on Facebook.
His set building work can be found on his website.

Are you affected as a creative by the covid crisis? Want to get inspired and connect with other creative businesses? Join my free community on Facebook, for marketing tips and business advice.

From grandma’s stuffy cupboard to statement designer piece. Meet Roc.

Mid-century modern furniture is often so beautiful and timeless, that it needs very little more than a clean and a polish. Sleek lines, minimalist looks and striking features, even after so many decades, those Scandinavian style sideboards, coffee tables and armchairs from the 1950s and 60s still look gorgeous. But some pieces become even better when someone with a good eye gets their hands on them. Caroline George of Roc Studio in Edinburgh, is one of those people. Her signature style includes strong geometric patterns to enhance the shape of the furniture. Today I am interviewing Caroline to find out more about her creative business.

Caroline, tell us more about yourself! What is your business and what do you offer?

I am the founder of Roc Studio and I bring unloved pieces of furniture back to life with my surface pattern designs. I source furniture myself, often mid-century classics like G-plan or Ercol, or customers can bring in their own pieces for a contemporary update. My business is in Edinburgh, which is also my home, where I live with my husband and two children.

What made you want to start this type of business?

I started my own business upcycling furniture already 11 years ago. First it was called Trash furniture, but it has since evolved into Roc. My degree is originally in fashion and textiles, but after working fashion for a bit I fell into interiors. I worked as a visual merchandiser at Habitat which fuelled my love for all things decor. After that I worked in property, staging and designing show homes for an upmarket developer. In 2009, I decided to turn my passion for vintage furniture into a business and I still love it. I am passionate about using what we have, being sustainable and creating an eclectic home and this is very much in the spirit of Roc as well.

What do you love most about your work?

The freedom of working for yourself is great, I kind of make it up as I go along, but it means I can pick my kids up from school and be there for them. It is not always easy juggling everything, but I wouldn’t change it.

How do you choose pieces and what is your creative process with them?

Most of the pieces I work on are a bit battered and in need of some TLC. A client might come to me with a piece of furniture or sometimes I already have a piece in my workshop, which needs an update. I don’t like to overdo the furniture and am quite minimalist in a way. I tend to work with the lines of the furniture, so if it has round handles for instance, then the design might feature circles. I always try and use colours for my designs that really bring out the beautiful warm tones in the Mid-century teak wood. Often, the client will also have an idea of the designs they like, a colour scheme in the room it sits in, or sometimes it’s just a piece of art work that they like that I can take some inspiration from.

It is quite a process from start to finish and can take many weeks. It’s not just a lick of paint and a few new drawer knobs. Usually I strip the piece of all the old varnish and if anything needs fixed then that gets done too. The doors might come off for painting, or the drawers stripped for new felt. There is always more work than you think, but the end result always makes me happy and my customers, which is the most important thing.

How has the 2020 lockdown affected your business?

At first, it was all such a shock for everyone. But I tried to keep going and then suspected I had the virus, which put me out of action for a couple of months, as I was very ill. I recovered though and still had a couple of commissions to do, so I have just continued working. Luckily my clients keep asking for furniture, so I am still surviving! I just need to keep my fingers crossed that it continues into 2021, but I stay positive.

upcycling business uk

How do customers find you, and what are your business challenges?

During lockdown, I built my new website, and I was really proud of myself that I got it done. I have an online shop on there now too, which is a new thing for me, and something I would like to build on next year. I am on all the usual social media channels, and I am trying to get better at PR and putting myself out there! Time is also always an issue. There’s never enough of it to fit everything in, so that is definitely an ongoing challenge for me. And knowing my value. Creatives are notorious for undercharging and over delivering!

What is the next step for Roc?

My goal is a bigger workshop next year with space to make my life easier. I would also like to take a holiday, haha! And I have been saying it for a long time now, but I would love to design some new products that are not quite as big as the furniture. And although most of my clients are in the UK, and especially in Edinburgh and London, I recently shipped furniture to the Netherlands, and I am now looking into shipping to Italy.

You may spot some Roc pieces where you are soon. If you are interested in seeing more of Caroline’s designs, have a look at the Roc website.


Interview with Rockin Cushions: cool covers for Ikea chairs

As a big fan of sustainable design, reducing landfill and creative upcycling, I was excited to recently speak to Michelle from Rockin Cushions, in Los Angeles. Michelle contacted me to collaborate, and I was very keen to feature her on my blog. Her creative buzz, amazing ideas and energy are contagious. I asked her about her business and plans for the future. Slip cover vending machines at Ikea, being one of them! Let’s hear more about her work.

Beautiful solutions for ‘disposable’ furniture

Michelle, tell us about your business. What is it you make?

I design and manufacture slip covers for IKEA furniture. The fabrics I choose focus on current decor trends, such as Scandinavian, Farmhouse, Boho Chic, etc. We fill the gap between buying a new upholstered piece of furniture and the current IKEA cover offerings. We hope that a new slip cover will save your “disposable” piece of furniture ending up in landfill. I feel strongly about reducing waste and with my covers I aim to offer people a very easy and affordable way to stay current without a big financial commitment.

new covers for ikea furniture

What is your background? Have you always been creative?

My parents immigrated to Australia from South Africa when I was a year old. My dad was a self-taught leather craftsman. I was taught to sew as a child and worked in our family business, which grew into a small manufacturing company in Australia. I studied graphic design and fine arts at University, but was also acting in commercials on the side, and pretty soon the acting became much more interesting. I decided to move to LA to pursue my acting career shortly thereafter.

The old rocking chair that sparked my business

What made you start your Ikea slip cover business?

After moving to LA, I encountered the Fashion District in downtown, and my passion for creating was reignited. There are so many people creating, making, sewing and producing there. It is really inspiring. At one point I was given a traditional rocking chair as a gift and decided to make a cushion for it, because I couldn’t find anything I liked. I put my design on Etsy and people really responded positively. The seed was planted. I then started getting a lot of requests for IKEA slip covers, and slowly things grew from there. Eventually about 5 years ago, I decided to ditch the acting and run my business full time.

What do you love most about your work?

I really love to source new fabrics and I definitely have a need to spend a few hours a week creating something. I just started my craft channel on Youtube, which I’m really enjoying. I also love receiving photos from my customers who are really happy with their purchase. That just makes my day.

How do you choose pieces and what is your creative process?

The IKEA pieces I choose to work with are simply the most popular ones. It’s a little tricky taking a chance on something new because you don’t know if it will stay in the catalogue for very long. And it costs a lot of money to create the covers in all the different fabrics, so that’s why I stay safe with the furniture that has been around for decades, such as the Poang and Ektorp sofas. The process is pretty simple – I either copy the original slip cover, or create a new design. My Poang covers for instance has been modified from the original so that it fits all the different Poang cushions universally. After we design the covers, it’s just a matter of getting it into production with all the fabrics we offer.

2020 has been a crazy, but incredible year for business

How has the 2020 lockdown affected your business? Did you have to adapt or work differently?

This year has actually been the most incredible year for me. In April, I made some face masks for healthcare workers and set up a FB donation page. I was interviewed on a local morning show and not only did we raise our donation target, we sold over 30,000 masks in a month. It was the most crazy experience! I was also able to get business funding and some grants, which had been impossible before.

And even though sales have been slower than normal for the slip covers, I’ve been able to focus on my Youtube channel and start a subscription box service, with six (gift) products that have been 100% upcycled from our waste materials, such as table / kitchenware, home decor items, fashion accessories and bags. I really believe there is more opportunity than ever right now for an entrepreneur.

How do you reach your audience, what do you do to promote yourself?

I have a Shopify store and we do email marketing. We’re also on the socials – Pinterest, Instagram, Facebook, TikTok, Youtube and we’re about to start live streaming tutorials on Twitch. Content creating is a lot of work, but it’s the new normal for every business right now.

What is your biggest challenge in your business?

Right now I’m targeting the commercial market, such as “IKEA for Business” customers, so finding the right sales people is difficult. I’m not technically in the furniture industry, so I’m working on making those connections. Also cash flow is always a huge challenge. Staying on top of bills etc when times are slow is tough.

What is your next step in your business? Are you looking for world domination?

Lol, yes and no! I would love my brand to live alongside IKEA, I dream of being able to make a significant difference in reducing landfill. I have a crazy idea of having Rockin Cushions vending machines in the IKEA checkout /warehouse section! Designing covers for furniture rental companies to help keep their products in use for longer, is also something I’d love to be doing. And then I have another dream of hosting a DIY/ home makeover show because it would be so fun! But, at the end of the day, I really just want to have a financially secure future and time to do things I love.

Rockin Cushions is based in LA, United States. They also ship internationally, mostly to the UK, Europe, Australia. They support the non-profit DAYS FOR GIRLS by donating fabric and participating in sewing workshops in LA to produce menstrual kits to girls in developing countries, many of whom would otherwise not be able to attend school.

www.rockincushions.com

Upcycled water bottle carrier tutorial

This coronavirus lockdown of 2020 has encouraged a lot of creativity in our household, including the upcycling of old clothes. If you can’t go to the shops, you got to be resourceful! Upcycling is an old hobby of mine and I had a lot of fun making these super quick water bottle carriers out of an old pair of jeans. How I did that? Read on for the DIY tutorial.

DIY water bottle carrier
The upcycled denim water bottle carrier!

Easy DIY water bottle carrier

If you have kids, then as a mum you know that on trips and hikes you are basically a packing donkey carrying everybody’s junk. Right? Now on a hot day, it can get a bit heavy dragging around litres of water for everyone. You also get fed up having to take out the bottles again because little Johnny needs another drink, even though it was only five minutes since the last one. Solution? Let them carry their own water!

It is super easy to make this DIY water bottle carrier out of denim. I don’t claim to be a neat sewer, I am a quick results, practical kind of person, but feel free to make your own improved, beautiful version of this bag. Mine looks pretty good I think, is sturdy enough to hold a bottle and wide enough to carry your phone or small purse too on your walks. I added a little pocket for a snack (or your public transport card!), which took a bit more time, but otherwise, you will have this made less than an hour.

What do you need?

  • An old pair of ladies jean trousers, ideally stretchy and tapered at the ankles. It needs to fit snug, but not too snug around your water bottle. You can, of course, use a wider trouser leg for a larger bag that holds more.
  • A thick, wide ribbon or fabric belt of a dress or something for the shoulder strap.
  • Optional pocket: a different piece of fabric or denim and a button for decoration
My eldest monkey, normally asking me for water every two minutes when out on a walk. No longer!

Step 1. Cut the trouser leg

You will be using the bottom part of the trouser leg. The best thing is to place your water bottle on top of the leg before you cut. Cut the fabric about 2cm (1”) longer than the bottle is. The hem of the trouser leg will be the top of the bag, so that bit is already done.

Step 2. Sew the bottom of your water bottle bag

Turn the fabric inside out and sew the widest opening (and not the existing hem) shut. Sew a straight line about 2cm/1” from the edge. Cut off the excess and sew a zigzag to finish to prevent the edge from fraying.

3. Add elastic through the top hem

Next I cut two small holes in the top of the existing hem (which of course is a ready-made hollow tube!) and used a safety pin to pull a piece of elastic (19cm) through. Now you could choose to pull a drawstring through the top, but I chose to put elastic in instead. A wider strap is more comfortable on the shoulder than a drawstring, but that doesn’t fit through the small holes of the top hem. Once you have the elastic through, tie both ends together. Tie it so that it makes a slightly smaller, stretchy opening without making it too hard to fit the bottle in. The elastic is really just to keep the bottle in place rather than to close the bag completely.

Step 4. Sew the pocket on

You can leave the bag like it is and skip straight to sewing on the shoulder strap, or you can embellish your DIY water bottle carrier with a handy pocket. I cut out out a piece of around 12 x 10cm of blue denim for contrast, using the bottom hem as the top of the pocket. With the square being quite small, I decided to zigzag the edges instead of folding them over, as that would become too bulky. Once you have done that, sew the pocket onto the bag, either using your machine or stitch it by hand. I added a little button just as a colour accent.

Step 5: Sew on the shoulder strap

The shoulder strap can be pinned onto the bag along the top across the full width. I sewed a straight line both along the top and the bottom of the strap to secure it. The ends of the strap can now be tied around the shoulder, adjusted to the person using it. It will be shorter for a child than for an adult obviously.

And you are done!

Eco-friendly Christmas decoration without tinsel

Who’s up for making some eco-friendly Christmas decoration? Christmas is a time of indulgence. Too much food and drink, too many gifts and a house full of decoration. Fun times for sure, but every year tons of plastic tinsel end up in landfill, as well as other stuff like broken fairy lights, plastic baubles and other Christmas decoration. Because stuff is so cheap these days, it is very tempting to go to low-cost supermarkets and pound/euro/dollar stores and fill your basket with new glittery pieces every year. I’m no saint, I’ve done it too! Because sometimes temptation gets the better of you and you think, nevermind, it won’t make much of a difference if it’s just me doing it. But it does.

Five DIY alternatives to tinsel

Today I am suggesting some alternative, fun and in most cases far more durable alternatives to plastic tinsel. Let’s get making! No time or skills or too much faff ? Find decorations at your local craft fairs or have a browse on Etsy.

1. Paper Christmas decoration

Last year’s Christmas cards cut into circles, stars or triangles make great garlands and bunting. Paper chains are easy and fun to make too. Get the kids involved on a rainy Sunday afternoon! Possibilities are endless with paper and an ideal way to kick off your eco-friendly Christmas this year. Keep it really simple or turn it into a more complicated project with folds and creases, or sew the pieces onto a string.

eco-friendly Christmas
eco-friendly Christmas

2. Christmas decoration with poms

Oooh…do you remember making these at school? Pom poms are so much fun to make and easy enough for little hands to help too. Use up old wool, or unravel an old scarf or jumper if you really want to go down the upcycling route. Tie them onto a string and create a fabulous home-made alternative to tinsel. Hang them in the tree or use as a garland. Read my other blog post about Christmas pom poms here.

eco-friendly tinsel
eco-friendly Christmas
pom pom garland Christmas

3. Eco-friendly Christmas decoration with pine cones

For a nice minimalist, kind-of Scandi look, go and collect pine cones on your next walk in the woods. Add a bit of silver or white paint to the tips if you like for a nice Christmassy touch.

pine cone garland eco friendly

4. Fabric Christmas bunting

Bunting is easy to sew and fun to create from any scrap fabrics lying around or old clothes. Choose reds and whites to make one in Christmas colours. Another easy idea is to cut triangles out of burlap and just sew the tops to a ribbon to create some home-made bunting. Still more fabric lying around? Make a wreath!

burlap bunting eco-friendly christmas

5. Beads and buttons

For more delicate looking decoration for your tree or fireplace, try stringing beads or vintage buttons (or remove them from clothes you no longer wear – you could use the fabric for bunting or a fabric scrap wreath!) on a thread at regular intervals for a ‘necklace’. Reusing your old clothes and buttons is a great way to create eco-friendly Christmas decor.

eco-friendly wreath and garland
eco-friendly tinsel

Upcycling tutorial: make a tote, basket or rug with plastic bag yarn

The plastic problem is still huge and creating big problems in oceans, in landfill and just generally making the earth look very ugly. Still, I am an optimist, and I believe change is coming, not tomorrow maybe, but we are heading in the right direction. People are generally becoming more aware of the ecological impact of especially single use plastic and social media is full of posts showing ideas of how to reduce the use of it in your own household. I am still guilty myself of doing unplanned, spontaneous grocery shopping, subsequently accepting single use carrier bags. I buy coffees on the go in takeaway cups. It is hard to be consistent and strict about these things while they are still constantly offered to us.

plastic yarn bag

Last year India banned all forms of disposable plastic in Delhi. Europe is proposing a ban on single-use plastic items such as cutlery, straws and cotton buds in a bid to clean up the oceans. The legislation is not just about banning plastic products. It also wants to make plastic producers bear the cost of waste management and cleanup efforts, and it proposes that EU states must collect 90% of single-use plastic bottles by 2025 through new recycling programs.

Upcycling tutorial

So that’s a bit about where we are at with single use plastic…but what about turning single use carrier bags into something that is usable for much longer, while they are still in existence? I am always in awe of how creative and resourceful humans are around the world. Who knew you could knit and crochet with the stuff?



How to make plarn?


1. Make a Crocheted tote bag our of plarn

plarn tote bag upcycling tutorial
Image and tutorial (in Spanish): La ventana azul

Image: MontClairMade


Plastic bags can be incredibly versatile and turned into very strong yarn for crocheting. When choosing bags for your project, consider color and texture. Select bags that are similar in thickness to create an overall good effect. Combine different coloured bags to create a pattern of colour, colour changes and patterns.

Supplies you’ll need:

20-25 clean grocery bags
Plastic crochet hook, size 6.50mm K
Scissors

Ready to give it a go?

Take me to the tutorial

plarn basket upcycling tutorial
Image: Jessyratfink

 

2. Make a basket out of plarn

A waste basket…out of waste! I love baskets for all sorts of uses, including toys, craft supplies, hats and gloves at the front door or yes, for paper waste.  How cute is this one made out of plastic carrier bags? And even better, no crocheting required.

Want to learn how?

Take me to the tutorial

3. Make a rag rug out of plarn

Great for outdoors, at the front door or in the bathroom, rag rugs made out of plastic carrier bags make surprisingly great mats. Here is an upcycling tutorial on how to make them. No crocheting needed.

Book tip: Life Without Plastic : The Practical Step-by-Step Guide to Avoiding Plastic to Keep Your Family and the Planet Healthy.
19,38 € Buy


Upcycling project: a vintage display cabinet goes oriental

I don’t have much time these days to work on furniture as much as I did on this upcycling project, but I think it paid off. I found the old display cabinet in a charity shop and it immediately caught my eye. It is always a guess what you come across in these places, but I just knew that this one had potential. And for 30 pounds, it was a steal.

seeing the potential

The vintage cabinet had gorgeous carved detailing around the edges, original, rippled antique glass panels and a design on the doors that reminded me of Japanese patterns. Japanese patterns, I thought? I think I have just the thing for that. Time to breathe some life into this treasure.

upcycling project graphite chalk paint

 

Repurposing vintage kimono silks

It was a smelly old cabinet.  The first thing I did was rip out the old vinyl lining paper from the back wall. It had obviously been stuck on in the sixties. I considered sticking some kind of patterned paper back on, but then I remembered a patchwork I had been sewing ages ago. I once ordered a batch of vintage kimono silk remnants and been trying to turn them into a blanket. As with many projects, it never got finished. How about I try and line this display cabinet with it? That would be perfect!

graphite chalk paint for the upcycling project

I chose a graphite chalk paint to cover up the dull dark brown varnish on the wood. I lightly brushed some dusky pink over the floral carving on the edging to make it stand out more. The inside I painted with the same pink. A wax and a bit of elbow grease gave the cabinet a nice sheen without becoming too glossy.

The cabinet is beautiful, unique and I am proud of the way it turned out.

It is so satisfying to bring an old discarded piece of furniture back to life and I think that whoever owned it in the past would be pleased to see it being loved again. I hope the future owner will treasure it forever.

upcycling project graphite chalk paint

upcycling project graphite chalk paint

upcycling project graphite chalk paint
upcycling project graphite chalk paint
upcycling project graphite chalk paint
upcycling project graphite chalk paint
upcycling project vintage kimono
upcycling project vintage kimono

Upcycling project: from smelly display cabinet to oriental chic

I don’t have much time these days to work on furniture as much as I did on this one, but I think it paid off. I found the display cabinet in a charity shop and it immediately caught my eye. It is always a guess what you come across in these places, but I just knew that this one had potential. Gorgeous carved detailing around the edges, rippled antique glass panels and a design on the doors that reminded me of Japanese patterns.

It was a smelly old thing though and the first thing I did was ripping off the old vinyl lining paper from the back wall, that obviously had been stuck on in the sixties. I considered sticking some kind of patterned paper back on, but then I remembered a patchwork I had been trying to turn into a blanket and never finished, made with a stack of vintage Japanese kimono silks. That would be perfect!

I chose a graphite chalk paint to cover up the dull dark brown varnish on the wood, and lightly brushed some dusky pink over the floral carving on the edging to make it stand out more. The inside I painted with the same pink. A wax and a bit of elbow grease gave the cabinet a nice sheen without becoming too glossy.

It is so satisfying to bring an old discarded piece of furniture back to life and I think that whoever owned it in the past would be pleased to see it being loved again.

Do you like this eye catching cabinet? It is for sale in the shop! Please get in touch if you would like to see it up close.

 

 

 

 

 

 

New stock: rocking chairs, sofas and retro writing desks

‘Upcycled’ metal rocking chair £135

Pair of kitchen stools, recovered in floral oil cloth £35 each or £60 for both

Mid century Danish teak sofa, reupholstered in grey cotton blend fabric £295
Mid century Danish teak sofa, reupholstered in grey cotton blend fabric £295
Lovely collection of purple glassware, from £6

Mid century Danish teak writing desk £160

Mid century Danish teak writing desk £160

Mid century Danish teak writing desk £160

‘Upcycled’ (painted top, sides and front details) vintage writing desk £95

‘Upcycled’ (painted top, sides and front details) vintage writing desk £95

Rocking chair revamp – patchwork project

I recently picked up a rocking chair – not incredibly ‘vintage’ (probably less than 30 years old), but a good shape and well built – possibly G Plan. The cushions had seen better days though and when a customer showed an interest in buying the chair I suggested doing it up for her in a patchwork style, using lots of lovely blue and grey fabric scraps I had lying around in the studio. I left the frame in its original blond wood state as I felt it matched the ‘Scandinavian’ look of the patterned fabrics and style of the chair. This is the result. I’m pretty pleased with it and I am sure it’ll look lovely in its new home!